An Extra Pair of Eyes

If you’re stuck and need some inspiration, have a look through these Latin phrases! One might kick-start an idea or two.

posted 2 years ago with 7 notes

kamigarcia:


Misunderstood vernacular #writing

kamigarcia:

Misunderstood vernacular #writing


pinknarc:

Part of why Writer’s Block sounds so dreadful and insurmountable is the fact that nobody ever takes it apart. People lump several different types of creative problems into one broad category. In fact, there’s no such thing as ‘Writer’s Block,’ and treating a broad range of creative slowdowns as a single ailment just creates something monolithic and huge. Each type of creative slowdown has a different cause — and thus, a different solution.”

posted 2 years ago via pinknarc with 8 notes

writersrelief:

Ever wonder why all short stories are called short, when in fact some of them are medium-length and some are long? These days, many editors of literary journals, especially online literary journals, are putting increasing emphasis on short short stories—that is, short stories that don’t exceed about 3,500 words.

Word count matters to editors. If you want to slim down your short stories, we’ve got some word-fat busting exercises for you! Soon you’ll be showing off your trim short shorts all summer (and winter) long!


gwenstacysyndrome:

There are many great pieces of novel writing software to aid writers. Above is a link to Storybook, a free open-source program to help you keep track of characters, chapters, plot progression, and pretty much anything else you can think of!

You can write directly in the program and later convert your work to easily usable formats like Word and html.

(As I said- there are many programs like Storybook available, so if this one doesn’t seem to fit, don’t give up!)

(ALSO! There are similar programs specifically for comics, plays, and almost anything else you can imagine. Now get to writing!)

FOR MAC USERS:

StoryMill and Copywrite are similar products just for Apple.



amazinglyartisticadvice:

Good reference for writers OR artists.

amazinglyartisticadvice:

Good reference for writers OR artists.


There are many great pieces of novel writing software to aid writers. Above is a link to Storybook, a free open-source program to help you keep track of characters, chapters, plot progression, and pretty much anything else you can think of!

You can write directly in the program and later convert your work to easily usable formats like Word and html.

(As I said- there are many programs like Storybook available, so if this one doesn’t seem to fit, don’t give up!)

(ALSO! There are similar programs specifically for comics, plays, and almost anything else you can imagine. Now get to writing!)

posted 2 years ago with 9 notes

Ten Tips to Help Aspiring Writers Stretch Their Fiction

I’m asked on occasion what advice I might offer aspiring writers. Here are ten random suggestions — the last a reference to the fact I was told by a creative writing professor when I was in college that I should become a banker.

1) Don’t merely write what you know. Write what you don’t know. It might be more difficult at first, but – unless you’ve just scaled Mount Everest or found a cure for all cancers – it will also be more interesting.

2) Do some research. Read the letters John Winthrop wrote to his wife, or the letters a Civil War private sent home to his family from Antietam, or the stories the metalworkers told of their experiences on the girders high in the air when they were building the Empire State Building. Good fiction is rich with minutiae – what people wore, how they cooked, how they filled the mattresses on which they slept – and often the details you discover will help you dramatically with your narrative.

3) Interview someone who knows something about your topic. Fiction may be a solitary business when you’re actually writing, but prior to sitting down with your computer (or pencil or pen), it often demands getting out into the real world and learning how (for instance) an ob-gyn spends her day, or what a lawyer does when he isn’t in the courtroom, or exactly what it feels like to a farmer to milk a cow when he’s been doing it for 35 years. Ask questions…and listen.

4) Interview someone else. Anyone else. Ask questions that are absolutely none of your business about their childhood, their marriage, their sex life. They don’t have to be interesting (though it helps). They don’t even have to be honest.

5) Read some fiction you wouldn’t normally read: A translation of a Czech novel, a mystery, a book you heard someone in authority dismiss as “genre fiction.”

6) Write for a day without quote marks. It will encourage you to see the conversation differently, and help you to hear in your head more precisely what people are saying and thereby create dialogue that sounds more realistic. You may even decide you don’t need quote marks in the finished story.

7) Skim the thesaurus, flip through the dictionary. Find new words and words you use rarely – lurch, churn, disconsolate, effulgent, intimations, sepulchral, percolate, pallid, reproach – and use them in sentences.

8) Lie. Put down on paper the most interesting lies you can imagine…and then make them plausible.

9) Write one terrific sentence. Don’t worry about anything else – not where the story is going, not where it should end. Don’t pressure yourself to write 500 or 1,000 words this morning. Just write 10 or 15 ones that are very, very sound.

10) Pretend you’re a banker, but you write in the night to prove to some writing professor that she was wrong, wrong, wrong. Allow yourself a small dram of righteous anger.

CHRIS BOHJALIAN

posted 2 years ago with 461 notes

writeworld:

I read this cool article last week — “30 Things To Stop Doing To Yourself” — and I thought, hey, heeeey, that’s interesting. Writers might could use their own version of that. So, I started to cobble one together. And, of course, as most of these writing-related posts become, it ended up that for the most part I’m sitting here in the blog yelling at myself first and foremost.

That is, then, how you should read this: me, yelling at me. If you take away something from it, though?

Then go forth and kick your writing year in the teeth.

The Shortlist:

  1. Stop Running Away
  2. Stop Stopping
  3. Stop Writing In Someone Else’s Voice
  4. Stop Worrying
  5. Stop Hurrying
  6. Stop Waiting
  7. Stop Thinking It Should Be Easier
  8. Stop Deprioritizing Your Wordsmithy
  9. Stop Treating Your Body Like A Dumpster
  10. Stop The Moping And The Whining
  11. Stop Blaming Everyone Else
  12. Stop The Shame
  13. Stop Lamenting Your Mistakes
  14. Stop Playing It Safe
  15. Stop Trying To Control Shit You Can’t Control
  16. Stop Doing One Thing
  17. Stop Writing For “The Market”
  18. Stop Chasing Trends
  19. Stop Caring About What Other Writers Are Doing
  20. Stop Caring So Much About The Publishing Industry
  21. Stop Listening To What Won’t Sell
  22. Stop Overpromising And Overshooting
  23. Stop Leaving Yourself Off The Page
  24. Stop Dreaming
  25. Stop Being Afraid

Click the link to read the whole article!

posted 2 years ago via writeworld · © with 554 notes